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Takahari Paper Lantern

Takahari Paper Lantern

Interior Decorations/ Folk Crafts / Traditional Folk Crafts

Shape
Traditional crafts, festival supplies. Size : [7sun] diameter about 20cm, [2shaku] diameter about 50cm, and others
Purpose
 
Features
Made with Ozu Japanese paper
Color variation
consultation required
Materials
Bamboo, Japanese paper, perilla oil, wood, etc.
Form of wrapping
Due to its fragility consultation is required
Supply capacity
10 per month
Awards received, Authorizations,etc.
 
Desireble retail price
[nanasun (21.2cm)] 8,000 yen, [pictured is shakuroku (48.5cm) 16,000 yen ~
Minimum lots
1
Delivery-date
2 weeks or more

Takahari Paper Lantern

Hirajiya Chochin Seisakusho

A tradition lives quietly on faithfully maintained by the seventh generation.

Originally used by samurai families, these large hanging paper lanterns called Takahari chochin are currently used to decorate Shinto shrines or are raised at the entrance of rituals. They are made by wrapping a bamboo frame with Ozu Japanese paper and hand drawing a character or crest on the outside. Changes in society have inevitably led to a decrease in craftsmen producing these lanterns. However, Hirajiya, founded in 1806, is enjoying its seventh generation preserving the traditional techniques of this craft. The time consumed to make a single lantern is great as each step is carefully completed by hand and the result is a simple yet profound presence in the atmosphere.

Person in charge : Moritoshi Kajio

Telephone number : 0893-24-2862 / FAX : 0893-24-2862

A tradition lives quietly on faithfully maintained by the seventh generation.

Originally used by samurai families, these large hanging paper lanterns called Takahari chochin are currently used to decorate Shinto shrines or are raised at the entrance of rituals. They are made by wrapping a bamboo frame with Ozu Japanese paper and hand drawing a character or crest on the outside. Changes in society have inevitably led to a decrease in craftsmen producing these lanterns. However, Hirajiya, founded in 1806, is enjoying its seventh generation preserving the traditional techniques of this craft. The time consumed to make a single lantern is great as each step is carefully completed by hand and the result is a simple yet profound presence in the atmosphere.